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News 02.07.18

7 February 2018 News


A Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Office patrol deputy has filed papers to run for sheriff. Mike Norton has filed his declaration candidacy paperwork with the Fond du lac County Clerk’s Office. Norton has worked in the Sheriff’s Office for more than 20 years, starting as a corrections officer in the county jail. Fond du Lac County Sheriff Mick Fink has not announced whether he plans to seek re-election in November. Candidates for the November election may begin circulating nomination papers April 15.

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Gov. Scott Walker says he wants to increase tax credits to entice consumer products giant Kimberly-Clark to keep its manufacturing facilities open in Neenah and Fox Crossing. The Dallas-based company said last week it was closing the facilities, resulting in a loss of 600 jobs. Walker says he is asking the Legislature to increase job retention credits from 7 percent to 17 percent, the same level extended to Foxconn Technology Group for its planned display screen factory and campus in southeast Wisconsin. Walker says retaining Wisconsin companies like Kimberly-Clark is just as important as attracting new businesses to the state.

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A judge isn’t wading into whether a new law requires schools Superintendent Tony Evers to get Gov. Scott Walker’s permission to write regulations. The state Supreme Court two years ago upheld a Dane County judge’s ruling that a 2011 law requiring agencies to get Walker’s approval on regulations doesn’t apply to Evers. Conservatives have asked the Supreme Court to declare that the new REINS Act applies to Evers. That Republican-authored law requires both the Department of Administration and Walker to approve regulations. A group of teachers filed a motion in the dormant Dane County case seeking a declaration that the REINS Act duplicates the 2011 law and doesn’t affect Evers. Dane County Circuit Judge Richard Niess denied the motion Tuesday, saying nothing suggests Walker plans to violate the 2016 ruling.

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A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by an Ohio dairy operation against Wisconsin officials over the state’s ban on the sale of ungraded butter. Minerva Dairy, of Minerva, Ohio, argued the ban unconstitutionally protected large Wisconsin-based dairies. The dairy had sold artisanal butter in Wisconsin until February 2017 when state inspectors discovered its product was ungraded and ordered the company to comply with the law. U.S. District Judge James Peterson, in a ruling Monday, says the state has the right to require grade labels on retail butter so that consumers can purchase the product with confidence in its quality. The Pacific Legal Foundation represented Minerva in the lawsuit. The foundation’s Joshua Thompson says an appeal is planned.

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