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News 01.11.18

11 January 2018 News


A Randolph man is accused of filing false income tax returns. The Dane County District attorney has filed four felony charges against Matthew Schraufnagel following an investigation by the state Department of Revenue. Schraufnagel is accused of filing false income tax returns over a four year period collecting over $4000 more in refunds than he was owed. The charges carry a maximum penalty of 24 years in prison and a $40,000 fine.

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The Wisconsin Chapter of the American Red Cross is making an urgent plea for blood donations. Red Cross spokeswoman Laura McGuire says there is an urgent need for blood and platelet donors of all blood types to address a winter blood donation shortage. McGuire says severe winter weather has resulted in more than 150 blood drives being forced to cancel. Several blood drives are planned this month in Fond du lac and Dodge counties. For more information about the blood drives in this area you may log on to redcross.org/local/wisconsin.

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A dozen homeowners living near the Wisconsin site for a massive Foxconn Technology Group complex are going to court to try to stop efforts to forcibly take their land. The property owners say the community where the plant is to be located is violating their constitutional rights by incorrectly using eminent domain to take their homes. Eminent domain allows the government to take private property for public use with compensation. The homeowners’ attorney, Erik Olsen, says the Village of Mount Pleasant claims it’s taking the land for public projects, such as roads and utilities. But Olsen says Taiwan-based Foxconn ultimately benefits. The village’s attorney, Alan Marcuvitz, says the lawsuit won’t stop the project. Eighteen acres the village is acquiring for the Foxconn complex belong to the landowners.

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Business and labor are clashing over a Republican bill that would prevent local governments from enacting a variety of ordinances related to employment matters. Proponents argued at a Wednesday public hearing that the measure is needed to create statewide employment standards both for employers and employees. But opponents including labor unions say the changes are anti-worker and undermine local government control. Scott Manley with Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce says the bill would help make the state more competitive by having fair, consistent, predictable and uniform employment regulations. The proposal would prevent local governments from enacting ordinances covering workers’ hours, overtime, benefits, discrimination and wage claims. The Senate Labor and Regulatory Reform took no immediate action on the measure.

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